Lego Therapy & Training

About

LEGO® Therapy was developed by Daniel Le Goff in the United States and researched by Gina Owens and colleagues at the Autism Research Centre, University of Cambridge.

The goals of LEGO® Therapy for adults and children with autistic spectrum conditions are to:

  • Improve their motivation to initiate social contact with peers
  • Improve their ability to sustain interaction with peers for a period of time
  • Develop flexibility of thought and problem solving skills

LEGO® Therapy has proved effective for children and adults with high functioning autism (HFA), Asperger Syndrome (AS), or pervasive developmental disorder – not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). It can also be effective for individuals with anxiety disorders (especially social phobia), depression, or adjustment difficulties manifesting as depression or anxiety.

 

There are a few different ways to organise sessions:

 

  1. Building in Pairs:

 

Through LEGO® Therapy children and adults on the autistic spectrum are encouraged to communicate with one and other and solve a problem by being given specific roles:

 

  • The “engineer” gives verbal descriptions of the pieces needed and directions for assembling them
  • The “builder” follows their directions, collects and puts the pieces together

 

  1. Building in Threes

 

  • The “engineer” gives verbal descriptions of the pieces needed and directions for assembling them
  • The “builder” follows their directions, collects and puts the pieces together
  • The “helper” sorts the bricks for the builder to collect

 

Roles are then switched so they all have a chance to be “engineer” ,“builder” and “helper” (and as they progress “creator”, “genius” and “master”). This division of labour with a common purpose allows children and adults to practice joint attention, turn taking, sharing, joint problem solving, listening and general social communication skills. Underpinning this is a very rigid set of rules for sessions or clubs:

 

1. Build things together

 

2. If you break it you have to fix it or ask for help to fix it

 

3. If someone else is using it, don’t take it

 

4. No yelling

 

5. Keep your hands and feet to yourself

 

6. Use polite words

 

7. Clean up and put things back where they came from

 

8. Don’t put LEGO® bricks in your mouth

Skill Certificates

 

 

 

Once individuals can demonstrate skills at a particular level, they are given a certificate to reward their achievement in front of all the participants at the end of the therapy session (e.g. when they build in a group successfully for the first time, they are given a ‘‘LEGO® Helper’’ certificate). Participants are awarded certificates on an individual rather than a group basis and are highly motivated to participate socially and build models together so that they can move up to the next level.

What We Offer

Our role as a facilitator is not to point out specific problems or give solutions, rather to highlight the presence of a problem and help individuals come up with their own solutions. Solutions that individuals have come up with are practiced until they can resolve them and the therapist can remind participants of strategies of the these in the future if similar difficulties arise.

Here at Autism Bricks UK we are able to provide therapy in several different ways mostly on site at our premises in Leeds:

– One to one sessions with a parent and child £30 plus cost of material (60 mins long)

– One to one sessions with a parent/carer/classroom assistant plus cost of materials £60 (120 mins long)

– Three on one parent/carer/classroom assistant £20 plus cost of materials (120 mins long)

– Six to one or three to one child to therapist sessions in schools (these need to be arranged through the school directly)

Find out more about our LEGO therapy and training

Contact us today to find out more about our LEGO therapy and training services

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